Beliefs

What Presbyterians Believe…

Presbyterians are distinctive in two major ways: they adhere to a pattern of religious thought known as Reformed theology and a form of government that stresses the shared leadership of both ministers and members. We have a vision of ministry that is vibrant and inviting and reflects the love and justice of Jesus Christ.

Evangelism and Witness – We are called to invite all people to faith, repentance and the abundant life of God in Jesus Christ, to encourage congregations in joyfully sharing the gospel, and through the power of the Holy Spirit to grow in membership and discipleship.

Justice and Compassion – We are called to address wrongs in every aspect of life and the whole of creation, intentionally working with and on behalf of poor, oppressed and disadvantaged people as did Jesus Christ, even at risk to our corporate and personal lives.

Spirituality and Discipleship– We are called to deeper discipleship through Scripture, worship, prayer, study, stewardship and service and to rely on the Holy Spirit to mold our lives more and more into the likeness of Jesus Christ.

Leadership and Vocation – We are called to lead by Jesus Christ’s example, to identify spiritual gifts and to equip and support Christians of all ages for faithful and effective servant leadership. With believers in every time and place, we rejoice that nothing in life or death can separate us from the love of God in Jesus Christ!

To explore the web site of PCUSA, go to www.pcusa.org.

  • Some Thoughts for Advent A Prayer for Advent

    How silently, how silently the wondrous gift is given.  

    There is something about Advent and Christmas hymns that speak to me.  I hope they speak to you to.  What are hymns, really, but prayers that we sing aloud together?

    Daylight lessens as this month progresses, and in the deepest of night there rises this new star, a birth that makes possible a new day in a kingdom that reigns on this earth but is not of this earth.  The irony of lessening daylight which brings about a new day of great joy dawning in our lives.  A new day that means light and life and love.

    In this month that always seems too chaotic, I pray that we each may find stillness and peace during some part of our days.  This stillness and peace, however, gets interrupted with the cries of a newborn baby—cries of need and cries of hope.  That might be what Christmas is: a realization of our own need, and a realization of our hopes for a world that feels broken all too often.

    In the darkness of these December nights I hope that we are able find comfort in the knowledge of this coming birth.  For this birth means the coming of light, and as the scriptures so wonderful remind us, this is a light that the darkness cannot and will not overcome.  This birth means everything.  This birth changes everything.

    May we find and celebrate this birth in ourselves, and in others, and in the world, for the sake of the one who will be born and who will shine forever.  His name is Jesus.  Jesus of Nazareth.  Born in Bethlehem.  King of kings.  Lord of lords.  Jesus—the Christ.

    How silently, how silently the wondrous gift is given.

    May there be enough silence in our lives, Lord, and time for expectation,
    that we may receive the gift we need,
    so we may become the gifts that others need.

    May the grace and peace of Jesus Christ be with you all this Advent and Christmas season.

    —Pastor Derek

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