Youth

Sundays at FPC: Classes & activities for Middle and High School are 10:00-10:50 a.m. (September-May). FPC youth Sunday school classes incorporate discussions and class activities that helps youth progress on a spiritual path and grow in faith and service.

Mondays at FPC: High School and Middle School alternate weeks in meeting in the Youth Room (green) from 6-8pm. Please contact Pastor Derek for details. View the church calendar on this website to determine which group is meeting.

Ecumenical Activities: Presbyterian youth combine with those from St. John’s Episcopal Church, Prince of Peace ELCA Church and Holy Trinity Lutheran Church for an Affiliated Youth Group for assorted outings, studies, and service.  Gatherings in the past year included a Yurt Retreat at Beaver Mountain,  a dance, pot luck & games groups, ice skating & movie/ice cream nights, various service projects, 30 Hour Famine, weekend retreats, and more. Newcomers always welcome!

Ecumenical Mission Trips in Summer for one week: Designed for Middle School & High School youth, summer mission trips focus primarily on faith-growing experiences through serving others. The trips vary each year in types of service, location, and duration. Students prepare through group-building activities, fundraising efforts and learning about the culture they will encounter.

Bagels & Bibles is a weekly summer gathering where Pastor Derek meets with middle school and high school youth at Einstein Bros. Bagels, 130 East 400 North in Logan. Here youth enjoy a light breakfast, discussion and a devotional.

Please contact the church office (435-752-0871) for more information on any of these events.


BOY SCOUT TROOP 1

Boy Scouts meeting at FPC for youth: Troop 1 (ages 11-18); Crew 1 (coed ages 14-21) For details: Paul Davis, Organizational Representative, 753-7016; BSA Office 752-4278

  • The Season of Lent Is Upon Us

    March 1st is Ash Wednesday, which marks the beginning of the church season of Lent.  Easter Sunday is the holiest day for the Christian faith, but Christians have long known that if we don’t prepare our hearts for the joy and excitement of Easter Sunday, then we might dilute its significance.  Depending on your individual faith journey, Lent may or may not be something that you appreciate.  Some of you look forward to the season, and perhaps ‘give up’ some earthly pleasure as a reminder of Christ’s suffering on the cross.  

    The season of Lent brings about a tone of solemnity in worship, and in our lives.  Some of us might find it to be the most meaningful season of the year because we take the time to reconcile our lives with the difficulties that we face, and we imagine ourselves walking with Jesus through the darkest days of his life leading up to his crucifixion.  I usually associate Lent with the idea of thin places.  'Thin places' is an old Celtic belief that the veil between heaven and earth is so thin that you can feel the presence of heaven from earth.  Perhaps you recall me preaching about thin places a few years ago.  Thin places may be specific geographical locations in this world, significant periods in your life, or a sense of the presence of someone special in your life.  Perhaps the season of Lent will be a thin place for you this year; where you can experience a bit of heaven on earth because the veil between this world and the next is so thin.

    This year, our Ash Wednesday worship service will be held at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, at 7pm.  Please join us; I will be preaching.  For many years now we have been partnering with Prince of Peace Lutheran Church and St. John’s Episcopal Church for ecumenical services on the high holy days of Lent.  On Ash Wednesday, we gather to begin this Lenten journey together with the imposition of the ashes upon our foreheads, with the stark reminder that from ashes we came, and to ashes we shall return.  This seemingly dark practice reminds us, however, that to God we belong, both in life and in death.

    Later, during Holy Week, we will again join with St. John’s and Prince of Peace for our Maundy Thursday worship service (at First Presbyterian on April 13th), and for Good Friday (the stations of the cross walk from FPC to St. John’s on April 14th), and an evening Good Friday service (at St. John’s).  I am so thankful that our three congregations can come together for these ecumenical services, reminding ourselves of the similarities we have in being followers of Jesus, rather than focusing on the differences of the world’s Christian denominations.

    You may notice the more solemn tone of worship during these weeks leading up to Palm Sunday and Easter.  It’s a chance for us to think about the significance of our own journeys with Jesus Christ, and just how much his life, death, and resurrection mean to us later.

    Grace and peace to you all this day,
    Pastor Derek

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